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Easter earthquake aftershocks could continue for 10 years

A magnitude-5.7 aftershock from Easter’s magnitude-7.2 earthquake along the U.S.-Mexico border echoed across Southern California early today, as hundreds of smaller temblors were recorded.

The 9:26 p.m. aftershock was centered about 5 miles southeast of Ocotillo in Imperial County and felt over much of Southern California, but there were no reports of damage.

Seismologists with Caltech and the U.S. Geological Survey said the Monday night event was an aftershock of the magnitude-7.2 quake that struck April 4 near the town of Guadalupe Victoria at 3:40 p.m.

“It was a big break along a fault in Baja and up into the U.S.,” Kate Hutton of Caltech said. “It caused the crust to re-adjust itself by having a further series of earthquakes and these are all aftershocks.

“Most occur on the same fault zone as the main shock, but they can branch off. They can be on adjacent faults also. This is a large member of the aftershock sequence.”

Aftershocks from the April 4 quake could continue for about 10 years.

Fire departments across the region went into earthquake mode Monday night, looking for damage, but none was immediately reported.

A magnitude-5.7 earthquake is “big enough to get your attention and possibly knocks things off shelves might cause some cracking in plaster and so forth,” Hutton said.

She said structural damage to buildings in Southern California was unlikely because of more stringent building codes.

In San Diego, the foul poles at Petco Park swayed and the interleague game between the Padres and Toronto Blue Jays was briefly stopped.

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Aftershocks expected today following last night's 5.7 magnitude earthquake centered in Ocotillo

SAN DIEGO - San Diego will be quivering today in the wake of a magnitude-5.7 aftershock to Easter's magnitude-7.2 earthquake along the Mexico border.

The 9:26 p.m. aftershock occurred about 5 miles southeast of Octotillo in Imperial County and triggered hundreds of smaller temblors along a cross-border fault line that has been active since before the big April 4 quake.

Between midnight and 2:17 a.m., 28 aftershocks ranging from magnitude-4.1 to magnitude- 2.5 were recorded by the U.S. Geological Survey.

The magnitude-7.2 earthquake "caused the crust to re-adjust itself by having a further series of earthquakes and these are all aftershocks," seismologist Kate Hutton of Caltech said. "Most occur on the same fault zone as the main shock, but they can branch off. they can be on adjacent faults also. This is a large member of the this aftershock sequence."

A 5.7 earthquake is "big enough to get your attention and possibly knocks things off shelves, might cause some cracking in plaster and so forth," she said.

Structural damage in Southern California was unlikely, she said.

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5.7 magnitude earthquake hits 5 miles southeast of Ocotillo; 23 aftershocks as of 11 p.m.

SAN DIEGO - According to the United States Geological Survey, at 9:26 pm tonight, a 5.7 magnitude earthquake struck, 4.3 miles deep and the epicenter was 5 miles SE of Ocotillo, California, in Imperial Valley. It was originally reported as a 5.9. It was also 22 miles west-southwest of El Centro and 65 miles east of Tijuana.

People in Fallbrook and Southwest Riverside County reported feeling the quake, as well as people from Los Angeles to LaQuinta. Over 9000 people reported feeling the quake on the USGS website in 556 zip codes.

According to Village News readers and Valley News readers, it was felt in Rosarito, Mexico, Chula Vista and as far north as Oxnard.

As of 11 pm there were at least 23 aftershocks, including two that were magnitude 4.1, within about a half-hour of the earthquake, the U.S. Geological Survey reported, with the last one reported at 10:1 pm.

It was reported that Petco Park was swaying and the announcer asked the crowd to stay calm.

The earthquake was an aftershock of the 7.2 earthquake centered near Mexicali April 4, according to a Caltech seismologist to KTTV-TV Channel 11.

City firefighters went to ''earthquake mode'' as a preventive measure at 9:55 p.m., said Devin Gales of the Los Angeles Fire Department, adding there was ''no damage reported yet.''

Did you feel it? We would like you to comment below with your experience and the intensity of the quake.

 

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