Village News - Also serving the communities of De Luz, Rainbow, Camp Pendleton, Pala and Pauma

By Joe Naiman
Village News Correspondent 

Supervisors approve list of roads funded by gas tax

 

Last updated 5/12/2018 at 4:52am



The state gas tax and vehicle registration fee increase which is part of the Road Repair and Accountability Act passed by the state Legislature is the subject of an initiative petition to repeal those increases, but unless and until changes are made in the Road Repair and Accountability Act, the legislation also requires local governments to provide the California Transportation Commission with a list of projects the tax revenue will be funding.

The list of projects the county of San Diego plans to fund during fiscal year 2018-2019 was approved on a 4-0 San Diego County Board of Supervisors vote April 25 with Ron Roberts in Asia.

“I am opposed to SB 1, the largest gas tax increase in state history, but if Sacramento is going to tax us I want the county to get its share of road improvements,” Supervisor Bill Horn said.

Senate Bill 1, which was signed by Governor Brown in April 2017, increased the gas tax by 12 cents a gallon effective November 2017 and increased vehicle registration fees between $25 and $175 based on vehicle value effective spring 2018. The legislation also requires local governments to submit a list of projects the tax revenue will be funding to the California Transportation Commission.

Approximately 70 miles of road segment in Horn’s 5th Supervisorial District will be resurfaced. The road resurfacing includes 36 road segments in Fallbrook, eight in Bonsall, one in Rainbow, one in De Luz and one in Pauma Valley.

A total of 181.6 miles of road segment throughout the unincorporated county will be resurfaced if a subsequent board of supervisors’ action to authorize contracts for asphalt concrete overlay and slurry seal treatment results in a contract bid, which will allow the work to be completed with the funding the county will be receiving. The county may choose to use funding other than the gas tax and vehicle registration fees for some of the resurfacing work.

The tax increases are expected to provide local governments with an additional $7.5 billion of funding over the next 10 years, including $538 million for San Diego County. The county expects to receive $39.3 million of Road Maintenance and Rehabilitation Account funding during 2018-2019, which will be the first full fiscal year of the tax and fee increases.

“It was at a cost to our residents,” Supervisor Kristin Gaspar said. “We must still work toward alternative and innovative solutions.”

The Road Repair and Accountability Act stipulates that the new funding shall be prioritized for expenditures on basic road maintenance and road rehabilitation projects and on critical safety projects, although the funding is also allowed to be used for railroad grade separations, street segment completions, pedestrian and bicycle safety projects, transit facilities, drainage and stormwater capture projects in conjunction with another allowable road project, traffic control devices and local match requirements for state or federal funding.

The county’s Department of Public Works maintains nearly 2,000 miles of road in unincorporated San Diego County, and road crews inspect the roads and prioritize them for preventative maintenance. The department utilizes a pavement management system which incorporates field review, resident and community input and mechanical test data collection to determine which roads are most in need of resurfacing. The structural deterioration of pavement is measured visually by assessing the degree and type of cracking, the surface deterioration and surface defects.

The road maintenance program also evaluates the preferred rehabilitation strategy. Asphalt concrete pavement overlays are used for severely degraded roads with extensive cracking or potholes, although if the road has only minor cracking and no significant surface damage a thinner layer of slurry seals may be applied to protect the road.

The Fallbrook road segments include 32 which will have a post-resurfacing expected service life of 10 to 15 years: 0.22 miles of Almond Street from Mission Road to South Hill Avenue, 0.81 miles of Alturas Road from Ammunition Road to the end of the county-maintained road, 0.19 miles of Alvarado Street from Wisconsin Avenue to the end of the road, 0.04 miles of Barbados Circle from South Hill Avenue to the cul-de-sac, 0.08 miles of Cancun Court from Alturas Road to the cul-de-sac and 0.17 miles of De Luz Road from Kalmia Street and Pico Avenue to Royal Glen Drive.

The Fallbrook road segments also include 0.35 miles of Dougherty Street from Main Avenue to the end of the county-maintained road, 0.04 miles of Farrand Court from Farrand Road to the cul-de-sac, 0.32 miles of Farrand Road from Palomino Road to Pepper Tree Lane, 0.06 miles of Hill Avenue from East Mission Road to Kalmia Street, 0.05 miles of Hill Court from South Hill Avenue to the cul-de-sac, 0.20 miles of Iowa Street from East Mission Road to Dougherty Street, 0.06 miles of Kalmia Street from Orange Avenue to Iowa Street, 0.24 miles of Kalmia Street from North Hill Avenue to North Main Avenue, 0.32 miles of Main Avenue from East Mission Road to the end of the county-maintained road, 0.11 miles of Malaga Way from Merida Drive to the cul-de-sac and 0.25 miles of Merida Drive from Alturas Street to South Hill Avenue.

The local road segments also include 0.20 miles of Minnesota Avenue from Dougherty Street to East Mission Road, 0.04 miles of Mission Road from East Mission Road to the end of the county-maintained road, 0.06 miles of Orange Avenue from East Mission Road to Kalmia Street, 0.25 miles of Palomino Road from Morro Road to McDonald Road, 0.50 miles of Pepper Tree Lane from the start of the county-maintained portion of the road to Calavo Road, 0.06 miles of Pico Avenue from East Mission Road to Kalmia Street and 2.00 miles of Rice Canyon Road from Mile Post 2.0 to state Route 76.

The local road segments also include 0.08 miles of Royal Glen Drive from De Luz Road to the cul-de-sac, 0.36 miles of South Hill Avenue from Almond Street to Hill Court, 0.15 miles of Todos Santos from Merida Drive to the cul-de-sac, 0.06 miles of View Street from De Luz Road to Main Avenue, 0.19 miles of View Street from Main Avenue to Iowa Street, 0.15 miles of Vine Street from East Mission Road to the end of the county-maintained road, 2.16 miles of Willow Glen Road from East Mission Road to the end of the county-maintained road and 0.12 miles of Wisconsin Avenue from Elder Street to Alvarado Street.

The other four Fallbrook road segments will have an expected service life of seven to 10 years: 3.48 miles of East Mission Road from Old Highway 395 to Gum Tree Lane, 0.12 miles of Pasadena Avenue from Elder Street to Alvarado Street, 0.10 miles of West Dougherty Street from DeLuz Road to the end of the county-maintained road and 0.09 miles of Yucatan Way from Merida Drive to the cul-de-sac.

Six of the Bonsall roads will have an estimated service life of 10 to 15 years after the resurfacing of 0.89 miles of Barsby Street from Goodwin Drive to the Vista city limit, 2.02 miles of Camino Del Rey from Camino Del Los Caballos to Old Highway 395, 0.15 miles of Curtis Drive from Barsby Street to the end of the county-maintained road, 0.58 miles of Guajome Lake Road from the Vista city limit to the Oceanside city limit, 0.13 miles of North Santa Fe Avenue from the Oceanside city limit to the Vista city limit and 0.44 miles of Riviera Drive from Barsby Street to the Vista city limit.

The two Bonsall road segments with an estimated service life of seven to 10 years are the 0.06 miles of Denison Way from Maelee Drive to the cul-de-sac and the 0.19 miles of Maelee Drive from Osborne Street to the cul-de-sac.

The work will also resurface 3.06 miles of Rice Canyon Road in Rainbow between Eighth Street and Mile Post 2.0, 2.69 miles of De Luz Road between Sandia Creek Road and Mile Post 5.0 and 2.88 miles of Cole Grade Road in Pauma Valley between SR-76 and Mile Post 5.0. All those resurfacing projects will have an expected service life of 10 to 15 years.

 

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