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Articles from the March 16, 2023 edition


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  • Humane Society and SDG&E rescue osprey tethered by fishing line

    City News|Updated Mar 21, 2023

    SAN DIEGO - The San Diego Humane Society's Project Wildlife team today assisted in the rescue of an osprey who was wrapped in fishing line, tethering her to her nest high on a light pole in Ocean Beach. The bird had first been spotted stuck in the nest yesterday afternoon, according to a San Diego Humane Society statement. ``The osprey made several desperate attempts to free herself so she could feed her three nestlings,'' the statement read. The string entrapping her foot kep...

  • Correction

    Updated Mar 20, 2023

    The front page article by Rick Monroe in the March 2 issue, “Parents want election, not appointment to high school board,” contained a paragraph that included a statement by Superintendent Ilsa Garza-Gonzalez about the book “Beyond Magenta” that was taken out of context. In the third paragraph on page A5, where the story is continued, it reads: “Garza-Gonzalez stated in her report to the board. ‘It discloses his experiences as being sexually active. The hyper-sexualization is not appropriate.’” The quote is...

  • Ford serves as Bonsall HS interim principal

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    Joe Naiman Village News Reporter Susan Ford was named interim principal for Bonsall High School. “Just a tremendous educator and leader, comes to us with a tremendous amount of experience and we’re grateful for her serving in the interim role,” Joseph Clevenger, superintendent of Bonsall Unified School District, said. Ford, who replaced Jason Fowler, retired as an educator before taking the interim principal position recently. She taught both English and music at La Costa Canyon High School from 1997 to 2003 and served...

  • Local residents named to dean's list at Biola University

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    LA MIRADA – Approximately 1,700 students were named to the dean’s list in fall 2022. Biola students are placed on the dean’s list to honor those with a GPA of 3.6 or higher while enrolled in 12 or more credits and whose cumulative GPA is at least 3.2. The following local residents were named to the dean’s list: Noah Bedard of Fallbrook, majoring in political science, and Annika Petersen of Bonsall, majoring in Bible, Theology and Ministry. “Inclusion in Biola University’s dean’s list is reserved for students who...

  • FPUD recognized with four awards

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    FALLBROOK – The Fallbrook Public Utility District has received four awards: a fiscal management award, another award for engineering and building the Santa Margarita River Conjunctive Use Project, and two budget-management awards. FPUD was awarded the "District of Distinction – Gold" accreditation from the Special District Leadership Foundation for its exemplary fiscal management policies and practices in district operations. The award shows a high level of accountability...

  • RMWD amends Rainbow Water Quality Improvement Project contract

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    Joe Naiman Village News Reporter The Rainbow Municipal Water District contract to relocate water mains and service laterals as part of the Rainbow Water Quality Improvement Project has been amended. A 5-0 Rainbow board vote Tuesday, Feb. 28, authorized a $109,288.12 change order to the contract with Ortiz Corporation. The board action also authorized Rainbow general manager Tom Kennedy to approve change orders totaling $240,000 above the original $839,850 contract amount, which allows for small contingency situations to be ha...

  • Sheriff's Dept. helps deliver Meals on Wheels

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    FALLBROOK – Staff from the Fallbrook Substation participated in the Meals on Wheel Food delivery service in the Fallbrook and Bonsall communities, Wednesday, March 8. Taking part in this project were Lt. Aldo Hernandez, Crime Prevention Specialist Heather Mitchell and Deputy Michael Albrecht. Meals on Wheels has been providing food delivery to seniors 60 and over for more than 60 years. They also provide dog and cat food thanks to a generous donation from the Helen Woodward...

  • Social Security and OIG Hold Annual Slam the Scam Day

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    WASHINGTON – The Social Security Administration and its Office of the Inspector General (OIG) continued to raise public awareness about Social Security imposter scams during the fourth annual “Slam the Scam” Day on March 9. Social Security scams – where fraudsters pressure victims into making cash or gift card payments to fix alleged Social Security number problems or to avoid arrest – are an ongoing government imposter fraud scheme. For several years, Social Security impersonation scams have been one of the most...

  • New podcast gives parents a 'Pediatrician Next Door'

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    SAN DIEGO – Imagine if harried parents could get the scientific and clinical expertise of a pediatrician just by walking only a few steps next door. That's the premise of a new podcast, The Pediatrician Next Door, by Dr. Wendy Hunter, M.D., a Fallbrook resident. She brings decades of experience in emergency and primary pediatric care to answer burning questions that parents are reluctant to ask. "In the emergency room, I saw a great many frustrated parents and their kids...

  • Five ways to help protect your health during spring travel

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    Dr. Amit Arwindekar Medical Director, UnitedHealthcare Global With spring break coming up soon, many California residents may be planning a getaway to visit with family and friends in other parts of the country or to explore an international destination. While spring-time travel can be a chance to reconnect with loved ones or visit someplace new, it can also present challenges. Any number of factors can lead to packed airports, and bad weather can cause annoying delays and cancellations. What’s more, nearly one in 10...

  • Grief workshop for people who recently lost a loved one

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    FALLBROOK – The Elizabeth Hospice is offering “Introduction to Grief and Loss,” a four-week workshop for people in the community who have experienced the loss of a loved one in the past year. Sessions will take place every Tuesday from April 4 through April 25 from 9:30 to 11 a.m. via Zoom. There is no cost to attend. Participants are expected to attend all four sessions. Space is limited and registration is required. RSVP by March 28 to [email protected] or 833-349-2054. “One of life’s greatest challenges is c...

  • Changing Times in Real Estate: Springing forward

    Ken Follis, Compass Real Estate|Updated Mar 16, 2023

    Ahh yes! I have always enjoyed Daylight Savings Time. Other than losing an hour’s sleep and having a tough time getting to church on Sunday morning, everything else is good. More daylight in the evening means more time to enjoy our wonderful evenings outdoors. Also, it reminds me of the changing seasons and warmer weather is coming. For all of us Realtors, it gives us more evening time for showings, so folks can sometimes take a look at properties after work. Also, more...

  • Review of all things Real Estate: Why employ local real estate professionals?

    Bob Hillery, CR Properties|Updated Mar 16, 2023

    As we live in the unincorporated area of North San Diego County and, as our basis was originally in agriculture, our real estate concerns are different than suburban areas. This article will topically address some of the areas that local real estate professionals are concerned about and will hopefully demonstrate why employing local real estate professionals makes sense. Local area knowledge: Areas of building challenges like clay soil, large concentration of boulders, steep...

  • Properly maintained smoke alarms can save a life

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    SACRAMENTO – Californians turned their clocks forward March 12 and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) is taking the opportunity to remind everyone to check their smoke alarms and replace the batteries in older alarms. While new smoke alarms now come with 10-year batteries, Cal Fire recommends that Californians test their smoke alarm monthly to ensure they are in good working order. Replace all smoke alarms after 10 years. A study done by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) in...

  • Tricks to trim your utility bill

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    A rapid rise in the cost of living will undoubtedly prove to be one of the major stories of 2022. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, energy prices rose by 41.6% in the 12-month period that ended in June 2022, marking the highest 12-month increase since April 1980. The significant spike in energy costs is somewhat misleading, as the BLS considers motor fuel prices, which rose more than 60% in the 12-month period ending in June 2022, part of the energy category....

  • Dana K. Acero/Winningham

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    Dana K. Acero/Winningham, age 66, of Elizabethton, Tennessee, passed away Sunday, Feb. 19, 2023. She was the daughter of the late Chuck Trojcak and Katherine Brush/Agust. She was a very caring and loving woman who loved her children, her grandchildren, her husband and the Lord, more than anything. Dana was so creative, always painting, or sewing; she did all kinds of arts and crafts. She loved everything from dogs to rocks to flowers; she truly loved nature. Dana loved to...

  • Joseph G. Hammer

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    Joseph G. Hammer passed away on Feb. 16, 2023, in Fallbrook, California. He was 71 years old. Joe was born in Whittier, California, on July 14, 1951, to Argele and Joseph Hammer. He grew up in Bakersfield and graduated from East Bakersfield High School. Always popular with his classmates, he played sports and was the lead guitarist in a rock and roll band. Joe joined the U.S. Navy in 1971 receiving a medical discharge after more than 20 years of service retiring with the rank...

  • Franklin L. Hopkins and Margaret Edith Hopkins

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    It's with great sadness that the Hopkins family announces the passing of Franklin L. Hopkins (Frank) and Margaret Edith Hopkins (Margie). Together they championed a home for all seven children brought together in their union of marriage in 1977, Frank with his four children and Margie with her three children. This creation of family may have come in the middle of their lives, but soon became forever in life. After the years of setting their adult children on their independent...

  • Cynthia Lee Particelli

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    Cynthia Lee Particelli, born March 3, 1939, was called home almost exactly 84 years to the date she arrived, passing away March 5, 2023, after a long battle with diabetes and many other health complications. Perhaps the strongest willed human ever met, she was also the most gentle, warm and living individual anyone ever had the pleasure of meeting. Passion was an understatement when referring to her. Cynthia was preceded in death by her husband Peter, whom she will be laid to...

  • Marlene Sheridan

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    Marlene Sheridan, originally of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, passed away on Feb. 27 at the age of 88 after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease. Before the onset of her symptoms, she was an active member of St. Peter the Apostle Catholic Parish and Fallbrook Art Association. Her art has been exhibited at the (former) French Gallery and the (former) Brandon Gallery. She is survived by her sister, Marynell Oechsner (Wyoming), her daughter and son-in-law Bronwen and Chris Southard,...

  • The little engine that couldn't

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    Assemblymember Marie Waldron 75th District California’s high-speed rail project keeps chugging along, despite cost overruns, construction delays, and forgotten promises. In 2008, voters passed Prop. 1A, a $9.5 billion bond measure to help finance high-speed rail. Promises included keeping costs under $40 billion, the state’s maximum investment would be 30%, funding from federal, private and local sources would pay the rest. Additional taxpayer subsidies were prohibited, and construction could not begin until all revenues...

  • Re: 'Does Nikki Haley qualify as a natural born citizen?' [Village News, Letter, 3/9/23

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    A reader questioned if Nikki Haley qualifies as a natural born citizen and thus has the right to run for president. The first seven Presidents of the United States of America were not born in the United States as it did not exist at the time of their births. The first president born in the U.S.A. was Martin Van Buren, born in 1782, while the widely accepted birthday of the United States is 1776. The 1964 GOP presidential candidate, Barry Goldwater, was born in 1909 in Arizona, but Arizona did not become a state until 1912. I...

  • Doctors Around the World Say It's Time to Stop the Shots

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    Jennifer Margulis Joe Wang Mar 11 2023 biggersmaller Recently, “COVID-19” and “Fauci” have been trending on Twitter. And when you click on those hashtags, you don’t get regurgitated government messaging. Instead, you get declarations such as this one from Dr. Eli David, which has been viewed 1.2 million times: “Fauci was wrong about lockdowns, masks, double-masks, Remdesivir, vaccine, boosters, and virus origin. Was Fauci right about anything? Give me a single thing about Covid which Fauci got right …” Tired...

  • Localism

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    Douglas V. Gibbs Mr. Constitution Localism is defined as local government handling the local responsibilities and revenue through locally elected public officeholders. Localism is a principle foundational feature of what became The American System. Localism is a key component in the decentralization of authority, guarding against despotic control from more centralized governmental entities, and against restrictions or mandates that may attempt to be issued by higher levels of government. In the United States Constitution,...

  • State of Emergency over

    Updated Mar 16, 2023

    Supervisor Jim Desmond 5th District Last week, the COVID-19 emergency finally ended at the county and state levels, hallelujah. As we move forward, I think it’s important to look back and learn from the past three years. My biggest hope is that politicians learn from the mistakes that were made. We should never lock down schools again. The lockdowns and school closures limited social interactions with peers and teachers and caused severe emotional distress for kids. The pandemic has also had significant long-term...

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